Lightroom Mobile 5.1 Workflow & Exporting

Last week I wrote about importing photos into Lightroom directly from the camera/card. This week I will continue with the next stage of my workflow. Yes I have written so much about iPAD workflows, this is because unlike my Mac workflow, my iPAD workflow is continually evolving as the software and platform develops.

The result of last week’s post was a named album of images for a project. All with just the basic copyright metadata and no other information.

My iPAD Pro is fitted with the keyboard cover and I also use the pencil with it. These 2 additions make important improvements to the workflow.

The first step is to pause the syncing (in fact I do this before the import as it is safer if the images are on the iPad only). Next enable a filter – to show only unflagged photos.

Click on the first picture and switch to edit mode. If the image is to be rejected hit the X key (just as in the desktop version). Due to the filter, the image will be hidden and the next image displayed.

If the image is a keeper, adjust as required, switch to the metadata view (the i icon) and type the basic subject in the title. (this will be picked up later – if many are the same, use cmd-c to copy the text to be pasted into the next image). Switch back to edit and press p to select (tap in the image area). The image is flagged and the next image is displayed (due to the filter).

Repeat until no images remain.

What happens next depends on your requirements. Maybe switch the filter to rejected, select them all and delete before un-pausing the sync to upload the images to the cloud and desktop.

To transmit the images to the newspapers or agencies, switch the filter to display flagged images only. These are the keepers.

Note: As an aside, the fastest way I have found to select all the displayed images is to hold down on a single image until it is selected, then click the box in the upper left corner. It changes from a minus sign to a tick. The share button can now be clicked to export the images.

Each export option contains it’s own settings which are far more detailed than in previous releases. Use the More Options to expand the settings. As each has it’s own settings it is now possible (for example) to configure the Save to Camera Roll to save a smaller image with a watermark suitable for social media whilst the Share To… option exports an image suitable to newspapers

For Social Media
For newspapers via shuttersnitch

Another big step forward is the share to now enables a direct export to a shuttersnitch collection.

I will not go into detail into shuttersnitch again as I have covered it so many times in detail. However I will show that the Title we added in Lightroom Mobile has indeed transferred and if used carefully, the metadata presets can build a full caption.. I will go into the shuttersnitch metadata editor in the next post.

A preset without a title but with a caption built from the title and capture time….
Image with caption

Once captioned the image are sent using the relevant action(s). See here for exporting actions…

This workflow shows images coming direct from the camera into Lightroom, on to the end recipient without hitting the photos app once, make the whole process faster and easier to manage.

Let me know your thoughts, I would like to hear from you.

Julie

Direct Import from Cards in Lightroom Mobile

At last! Its been a long while coming but finally we can import images directly from a camera/card into Lightroom Mobile on an iPad!

Apple’s iOS13 update opened up the Files application, allowing users to access data on external devices such as USB sticks, Hard Drives and of course Cameras/Cards. It took Adobe a little while to catch up but during December, Lightroom Mobile 5.1 was released which added the ability to browse locations in files.

Much of the information I have seen online says that it is possible to access the card directly from the import button after inserting it however I have not found that to be the best way to work. My workflow is to import the images directly into an Album for the project.

Add photos from Files into a specific album

Selecting from the Album Options … I Add Photos and select From Files. This enables the location to be selected, normally the Untitled USB device, browsing down to a lower folder. Once all the images to be added have been selected, click Open.

Preparing Import!

Lightroom then looks as though nothing is happening but take a look at the cloud icon where the sync progress is displayed…

It takes a while to prepare the import and then, one by one, they start appearing!

Hey Presto!

It’s a very simple process, one that is not the most obvious way of importing the images but it makes a huge difference to the iPad workflow, now mimicking more closely typical laptop workflows.

It means less reliance of the iOS native photos app and less housekeeping required on the iPad. In fact with the other updates in the latest Lightroom Mobile (major changes to the Export function , which I will detail in the next post), the photos app may be bypassed completely. Stay tuned!

Wandering with an X-T3

Finally I have upgraded one of my X-T2’s to an X-T3!

X-T3 / 27mm@F3.6 / ISO2000

The delay was down to a number of factors: Firstly I run my business in a cycle, needing to ensure each investment improves the business and pays for itself over its lifetime and my X-T2’s have been doing the job more than adequately.

X-T3 / 27mm@F3.2 / ISO2000

Secondly, having used and loved the X-H1 I was hanging out for news on an update to that form factor using X-T3 technology. Unfortunately the X-H2 seems unlikely at the moment according to the rumours and the opportunity arose for a “cost effective” upgrade.

Christmassy selfie’s. X-T3 / 27mm / ISO2000.

This led to my Christmas wander around the west end being the first chance I had to get aquatinted with the X-T3.

X-T3 / 14mm@F2.8 / ISO2000

Moving from the 2 to the 3 is painless, I configured the buttons and menus on the new camera within 30 minutes and the only real issues were getting used to stiffer front and rear dials plus a new way of transferring images wirelessly.

X-T3 / 27mm@F3.6 / ISO2000

This later model is definitely more responsive than the model it replaces.

X-T3 / 27mm@F2.8 / ISO2000

As I was walking around Covent Garden on a dark, wet evening I was using higher ISO’s, aiming to show the Christmasy atmosphere. Despite the file size being bigger there feel much cleaner than from the “2”.

X-T3 / 27mm@F3.6 / ISO2000

It has been widely documented that the focusing is much better – I totally agree and the face recognition is way quicker working in lower light. The image below was shot through a bus window as we passed, I’m not sure the X-T2 would have focused quick enough.

X-T3 / 56mm@F1.2 / ISO80

The lower ISO’s are also very useful when working wide open with the faster lenses like the 56mm/F1.2.

Overall despite using the X-T3 without a battery grip (which I always to on my X-T2’s), I was very impressed by its responsiveness and the clean images. This does still leave me in a quandary though, especially with a lack of indicators coming out of Fuji on the future of the more robust professional X-H body. Fuji are brilliantly open with their lens roadmap which really helps business planning, it’s just a shame the openness is not being carried through on the camera bodies (although I do understand this as it is more competitive).

X-T3 / 14mm@F3.2 / ISO2000

So the question remains… Do I upgrade my remanning 2 X-T2s’ or do I continue to wait?

Merry Christmas xxx

Assignments Live: Alan Crowhurst followed by John Downing’s Legacy

All I would like to hilight this talk that is open to BPPA members and non-members.  

First up is Alan. Alan Crowhurst is an award-winning horseracing photographer contracted to Getty Images. His life has always involved racing, his grand father was a racecourse bookmaker. In this interview Alan talks about growing up in Brighton, taking up photography, his passion for his profession, what it takes to get an award-winning ‘Crowhurst’ shot and his hopes for the future. 

Image by Alan Crowhurst

Following Alan, John Downing’s son Bryn Downing will present “Behind the Lens” , a 30 minute film on his father John Downing. 

After the film a slideshow of John’s images alongwith the stories to go with them told by Hazel Thompson . Hazel has known John for 20 years, working with him on his “Legacy” book. 

If you are unaware of John’s work – do a quick google and you will realise his impact on photojournalism as well as being a foundering member of theBPPA … 

This will be a great evening … and is FREE!!!

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/assignments-live-alan-crowhurst-followed-by-john-downings-legacy-registration-78086253085

Primes for the Prime Minister

I am just back from 3 weeks of party political events, photographing the autumn conferences of our largest political parties; starting with the Liberal Democrats in Bournemouth, moving on to Labour in Brighton before finishing up with the Conservatives in Manchester.

It’s a gradual build up of importance culminating in the Prime Ministers speech – arguably the most important event of the 3 weeks (especially this year with BREXIT and the stories circulating about our Prime Minister Boris Johnson).

I headed up to Manchester having the 200mm/F2 Fujion lens on hire again, along with the 1.4TC (giving the equivalent of 300mm/F2 and 420mm/F2.8 on my Fuji X-T2 bodies). Added to that I took my normal supply of 3 x X-T2, the 14mm/F2.8, 27mm/F2.8 pancake, 90mm/F2 and the 50-140/F2.8 (just in case but the plan was not to use it).

My workspace on the final day – taken using the “miniature” filter on the X-T2 with the 14mm

On the morning of the PM’s speech, we arrive early for a briefing that informs us of the plan for the speech; entrance, exit, timings, security arrangements (where we can stand, where not) etc.

With the stories circulating about the PM it was clear that “the picture” of the day would be Boris and Carrie (his girlfriend) leaving at the end of the speech. However the briefing made it clear that getting this image clearly would be very difficult and as the pool photographer would get it perfectly, it was not worth worrying about.

So I formulated a plan..

I would start at the rear at the top of the stadium seating to photograph the PM as he enters, I would then bit by bit move around the rear of the hall, over the stadium seating at the other end before working round to the rear quarter, photographing Boris “conducting” his troops before working my way back to the original position for his exit.

Arriving in the hall before a good while before the speech I was pleased that as I suspected, most of the photographers covering the event had opted for the central positions to shoot the “traditional” speaker image. I was happy to be sitting up at the back near the entrance alone, hoping the others had missed a trick and that my plan was not totally unworkable.

Waiting, I shot a few images of party members around me and the general atmosphere. Then the moment arrived, the PM walked in alone down a dark part of the hall below me to greet members down the bottom of my seating area.

Atmosphere before the Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, makes his keynote speech to the Conservative Party Autumn Conference on Wednesday 2 October 2019 at Manchester Central, Manchester. . Picture by Julie Edwards/LFI/Avalon. X-T2 + 14mm

My plan with the blog post now was to show two totally out of focus images showing that we all make mistakes totally contrary to how we are supposed to portray ourselves online. However going back through the images I have found one that was in fact useable, one that I missed in the heat of the moment editing on the day…

Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, enters to make his keynote speech to close the Conservative Party Autumn Conference on Wednesday 2 October 2019 at Manchester Central, Manchester. X-T2 + 90mm @ F2

Starting with establishing shots on the 200, 90 and 14….

Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, makes his keynote speech to the Conservative Party Autumn Conference on Wednesday 2 October 2019 at Manchester Central, Manchester. . Picture by Julie Edwards/LFI/Avalon. X-T2 + 14mm
Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, makes his keynote speech to the Conservative Party Autumn Conference on Wednesday 2 October 2019 at Manchester Central, Manchester. . Picture by Julie Edwards/LFI/Avalon. X-T2 + 90mm

Then adding the TC on the 200 (giving an equivalence of 420/F2.8) before moving down the back and shooting through spaces between the seating. A quick nod with one of the PM’s security detail to confirm all was ok with the location (next to him) , staying there for 5 minutes or so before moving on to the next location …

Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, makes his keynote speech to close the Conservative Party Autumn Conference on Wednesday 2 October 2019 at Manchester Central, Manchester. . Picture by Julie Edwards/LFI/Avalon. X-T2 + 200mm/1.4TC
Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, makes his keynote speech to close the Conservative Party Autumn Conference on Wednesday 2 October 2019 at Manchester Central, Manchester. . Picture by Julie Edwards/LFI/Avalon. X-T2 + 200mm/1.4TC

Having been briefed that the speech would be 40-45 minutes I allowed myself approximately 5 minutes in each location before moving on, getting the the far point on time for the “conducting” shot, before returning via the same method to my original position.

Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, makes his keynote speech to close the Conservative Party Autumn Conference on Wednesday 2 October 2019 at Manchester Central, Manchester. . Picture by Julie Edwards/LFI/Avalon. X-T2 + 200mm/1.4TC
Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, makes his keynote speech to close the Conservative Party Autumn Conference on Wednesday 2 October 2019 at Manchester Central, Manchester. . Picture by Julie Edwards/LFI/Avalon. X-T2 + 200mm/1.4TC

Once back, I was joined by one other photographer in this position for the exit but as there were about 8 positions reserved for us there was plenty of room. Planning for a “melee” image as the PM leaves, I removed the TC….

Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, exits the Conservative Party Autumn Conference on Wednesday 2 October 2019 at Manchester Central, Manchester. Boris huged Carrie Symonds, his girlfriend, before greeting activists as he exited the hall. Picture by Julie Edwards/LFI/Avalon. X-T2 + 200mm

In all, photographing the speech and editing took about 6 and a half hours; from entering the hall at 8am for the briefing , planning, re-entering the hall at 10:30am through to leaving it at about 12:45 and then finishing my edit with all images with the agency by about 2:30pm. All for a set of photographs that I knew were unlikely to make the front page the next day because, as I said, the story was Boris and Carrie.

Not every paper went with the pooled “couple” image.. but most did…

Onwards…

Royalty, Celebrity and the Press at The Potteries Museum and Art Gallery – The Talk

Further to my last post, at the weekend I did indeed make it up to The Potteries Museum and Art Gallery where I spoke about my journey to the world of Entertainment photography.

Celebrity photographer and BPPA Board member Julie Edwards speaks at The Potteries Museum and Art Gallery in Stoke-on-Trent on 18th August 2019 as part of the BPPA Assignments exhibition.

At 1pm Sunday approximately 20 people joined me in the exhibition space of the Assignments 2019 Gallery. 

Celebrity photographer and BPPA Board member Julie Edwards speaks at The Potteries Museum and Art Gallery in Stoke-on-Trent on 18th August 2019 as part of the BPPA Assignments exhibition.

My slide show included over 100 images with subjects such as:

  • Childhood Dreams
  • My Journey – From my first published image (The Sunday Times 13th Jan 2008)
  • Access (The Key)
  • Working with “Stars”
  • Camera Shy “Stars”
  • Papping (or not!)
  • Dealing with photographing your idols
  • Dealing with Egos
  • The rocky relationship between celebrities and the press
Celebrity photographer and BPPA Board member Julie Edwards speaks at The Potteries Museum and Art Gallery in Stoke-on-Trent on 18th August 2019 as part of the BPPA Assignments exhibition.

The talk itself ran for an hour, after which the questions and answer session lasted another 30 minutes with all sorts of interesting points raised.

It was great fun, I really enjoyed it and despite all the hard preparation I would be really happy to do it again should anyone express an interest. If you are, please do not hesitate to contact me!

I even got asked to sign one of the Assignments 2019 books (as I was on the creative team and one of the curators of the exhibition). It is a great book and well worth a look (they are selling fast).

I would like to thank the Potteries & Art Gallery Team who were really helpful.

I even got asked to sign a book at the end!

Royalty, Celebrity and the Press

Just a heads up.

I am doing a little talk at the Potteries Museum and Art Gallery in Stoke this weekend (18th August).  If you are free why not pop down and say hello. There will be cream tea’s, a good selection of photos (not all mine) and (hopefully) an interesting talk (plus the BPPA’s assignments exhibition) .

Info and booking:  http://www.stokemuseums.org.uk/pmag/whats-on/events/?event=EVENT598806

Hopefully see you there!