Putting it all together (Workflow pt. 6)

Camera, Images, Action !!

To paraphrase a well known saying. If you have followed these last few posts you will know that we are sending images from Lightroom Mobile to ShutterSnitch where we have configured Metadata & FTP locations to send the images to. Now lets tie it all together.

Accessing the gear icon for the actions.

The sliding arrow points to the action that will be applied to each image as it arrives in the application. So what does this particular action do?

That action on my system, changes the file name to suit the destination (I wont break this down – it should be self evident once you add this task to your action) then it applies one of the Metadata presets (as I showed a few posts back). Finally it exports to the FTP location.

The clever bit being that if the send to the location is a success , the action “Sent Alamy” is also run. What does that do?

It applies another Metadata Preset (one that only sets the rating and label).

Then it moves the image to another collection “ALL SENT”

This (hopefully) leaves the initial collection empty as all the images move out of it as they are sent. Any that do remain need re-sending.

The final 2 images of this post show Lightroom and ShutterSnitch sitting side by side on the iPad screen (use the 3 dots to set up split screen view) allowing editing to continue as ShutterSnitch sends.

This post ends the workflow as it is on the iPad itself. The next post will start to look at how I work on the desktop, moving the images off of the iPad, consolidating the images in the main library and other processes that have really advanced my workflow. (Beware – Lightroom plugin’s ahoy!)

Any comment or questions – get in touch!

Quick FTP Setup of ShutterSnitch (Workflow pt 4.5)

This post is just going to be a very quick How To configure sending images to an FTP server.,

I mentioned previously that the key to this app are the Actions and this is where we need to head to configure sending. Use the gear icon in the collection to access then click Edit.

Create a new task

Name it then click + at add a task

The only task we are going to add (at this stage) is to Export to a Location

Next the list of available locations are listed. (So we can define a number of locations – have listed a number of agencies, folders etc). Click Edit to create a new one and the green + next to FTP.

Enter the FTP details required (probably provided by the agency, client etc).

Note we can configure particular processes to happen as part of the sending task for example sending a re-sized version of the image or kicking off additional tasks if the send was successful.

The next post will put the metadata and sending posts into an action that handles the image as it arrives in ShutterSnitch.

I look forward to your comments.

Have You Meta data ? (iPad Workflow pt 4)

This post is a duplicate from one a few years ago but with some additional ideas for using collection names with a few more examples showing how flexible the system is.

From our last post we are at a point where we have exporting images from Lightroom to a collection of images in ShutterSnitch with key information (main image description) in the title field.

Note: I have totally skipped actions which ShutterSnitch may apply to arriving images at this point – if you have actions defined, for the sake of setting up the MetaData, ensure “Do Nothing” is selected. This will make sense later.

The first issue is, where do we start with our data? Can we start with Photomechanic? The answer to this is yes we can. I export the XMP from PM into Dropbox and then on the iPAD, export the file into ShutterSnitch.

Note: If starting from a Photomechanic template, the variables will need replacing as the syntax is different.

Select file in DropBox / Export / Copy to Shutter / Create a Preset

The i Icon on the top toolbar switches ShutterSnitch to the Metadata Editor.

The Metadata Editor

As shown in the above images there are a number of options along the lower screen. The left-most tool is the Preset Editor

The choices are just to select a preset or use the Edit button to edit the presets available (the usual iOS left swipe to delete) or click to edit. Hold down to duplicate an existing preset.

First a basic preset of mine (from a Kermode 3D show) where the caption is automatically built from the Title (as added in Lightroom) and a number of other fields. For this show I know the location and all the other details. The only things that change are the subject/person. In the image (Title) and the Date.

The blue circle tick to the right indicates wether the field is applied in the preset, so as we are using the title field from Lightroom this is unticked next to the Title/Object. Notice the %%titleObject%% – this is a variable .

There are far fewer in ShutterSnitch. They may be accessed from the tool hi-lighted above. Below is a typical preset driven by the Title/Object Name field with the date automatically added also.

Headline, Caption, Keywords and other metadata in the preset.

And the next example is the template I used at Glastonbury this year. Note. That I have brought the %%colname%% variable into play (Collection name). This gave me the simple solution for ever changing locations (or events), multiple image collections, one for each stage or location, sending images from Lightroom direct into the correct collection building a complex caption.

Hint: As we are driving the Title / Object Name from Lightroom, all of the above preset(s) could be applied to all images when selected and a quick check as you flick through will reveal all of the fields set. Alternatively they could be applied through an action automatically as the image(s) arrive from Lightroom (hint!)

Once the preset is created, other tools are available in the editor. Quick select strings (which are field sensitive, so create them in the Title field if that is where you plan to insert them) may be created and selected.

This enables a list to be built, maybe copying and pasting from a website before the event

Use Split Screen on the iPAD to Copy/Paste into Quick Select Strings

The final options are Shortcodes.

Press and hold to edit the available lists. Creating new Sets and editing are fairly straightforward.

In use Shortcodes are slightly less usable than in Photomechanic as after entering the code (however many letters you use), the Icon (tee-shirt) needs a quick click for the software to expand the code to it’s full length. Shortcodes do, however save on spelling errors and incorrectly titled subjects.

Once the metadata is added the images can be sent (most likely using FTP ). The next post will look at configuring the FTP before we start putting it all together in an action that automates the whole process.

More Soon. As ever – let me know what you think.

iPad Workflow Part 2

This post is really just a re-write of an earlier post (here) and to be honest this part of the workflow has not changed much although I will add a few more notes.

Having imported the images into a separate folder (as covered in the last post here) , I set a filter to show only the unflagged photos.

This means that once I have finished with an image (at this stage) it disappears from view. The shortcut keys X & P work the same on the iPad / Lightroom Mobile as they do on the desktop (reject & pick) so hitting X means I am straight on to the next image. If the image is a pick, I complete the edit first before labelling it as a picked image (this is where having a keyboard on the iPad makes a huge difference).

Note: There is no need to switch into any other view or mode, the X & P keys work in the edit screen (shown below)

My Presets – replicates my Lightroom Classic

One of the key features of editing in Lightroom are the develop presets. My mobile presets mimic my desktop (Lightroom Classic) presets. However getting these presets from your desktop to iPad is not the simplest procedure. There are basically 2 options.

Use an image (or number of images) that are synchronised between the devices:

  • In LR Classic (desktop), apply the preset to transfer to an image.
  • Wait for that image edit to synchronise onto the iPad.
  • On the iPad, select the image & Create preset using the current settings

Use Lightroom CC on the desktop to import develop presets

  • The Adobe Photography plan includes the Lightroom CC version
  • Download this to your desktop/laptop in addition to the Classic version
  • Open Lightroom Classic and view the Presets Settings in the preferences to show the presets folder. (Once you have the folder you can close this application).
  • Open Lightroom CC, From the file menu Import Profiles & Presets
  • Select the presets from the folder found above.
  • The presets will synchronise.

I always start and edit with one of my standard presets then tweak it. Another shortcut here is the cmd-c / cmd-v (copy/paste) which works for develop settings again, as on the desktop. So once I have the image as I like it, I cmd-c copy the develop settings (a window displays confirming which settings I wish to copy).

Copy Settings

Cmd-v asks no such questions and just pastes those settings on to the current image

One of the things I don’t understand is that Adobe have implemented some of the keyboard shortcuts but not all of them. I.e. why is cmd-z for undo not implemented? Or R for resize. See this post in the support community.

Depending on the specific job, I either add a title in the metadata now, before selecting pick or I pick and run through all of the images once I have edited them all, adding the title to the metadata. To edit the metadata, select the I icon at the lower right.

Note: I only add the title. The caption is generated at a later step.

Once the title is added, I select P to pick before moving on to the next image. Repeat until all of the images have been viewed.

No more unflagged photos

The full range of Lightroom edit controls are available (Geometry, Noise Reduction, Sharpening etc) so these is no reason that the editing process should be any different to how it is on a desktop. For those of you that are worried about the speed of editing, my M1 iPad Pro is way more responsive editing the 50MP Raw files produced by my GFX than my 2019 15” MBP.

If there is anything else you want to do to the image(s) which you cannot do in Lightroom (for example montaging images together), the share button has an edit in photoshop tool. Photoshop on the iPad is a tool that is developing quickly, it in no way matches its desktop version yet but it does feature layers, layer masks and adjustment layers, working well with lightroom.

Editing & Export Options

This sums up my image selection and editing process. The next stage is to export the images (accessed from the share button) – which will be the subject of the next post (scheduled for Monday next week)

In the meantime, if you have any questions or would just like to comment , would love to hear your thoughts, especially if you have another way of doing this.

Until Monday ..

Mobile Workflow Overview

I mentioned in my last post that these writings would be more about my workflow, thoughts and practices and less about camera equipment reviews.

The next few posts will revisit my mobile workflow and the use of the iPad as a very serious tool (laptop replacement), starting with this very basic overview.

A very poor iPhone image of my iPad in its keyboard case

My mobile (travel) kit consists of;

  • IPad Pro M1
  • Gold and Cherry iPad keyboard case
  • Apple Pencil
  • Apple Magic Mouse (Series 2 preferred)
  • Lightroom Mobile (Adobe photography plan inc. Photoshop)
  • ShutterSnitch
Lightroom Mobile & ShutterSnitch running in a split screen

One of the key improvements over the last couple of years of using the iPad has been the multitasking (various split screens, slide over etc) and later posts will show how the applications can work together in a similar way to a full blown computer (mac or otherwise).

The workflow outline:

  • Create Collection in Lightroom for job
  • Import from memory cards direct into collection
  • Select and edit photos in lightroom
  • Add titles
  • Create a collection in ShutterSnitch for the job
  • Share images to ShutterSnitch collection which completes the captioning and sends via ftp
  • Archive the images
Lightroom during the image selection and editing process

The next post will start to detail the intricacies of using Lightroom efficiently and outline some possible pitfalls (there are a few!).

Until then.

X-T1: Firmware 4.3 Update

Amidst the fuss over the launch of the X-Pro2, the latest firmware update to the X-T1 has come and gone almost unnoticed.

Yes, this was just a re-issued of the ill-fated 4.20 release (which had a slight bug in it) but try to find a review or thoughts on release 4.20 or 4.30 and you will struggle.

There are a few tweaks to the MF/AF workings in this release (which to be honest, I have not got my head around) but there are also 2 major updates that will really help me.

  • The flash now works in the continuous drive modes. I.e. I can use my flash at 3 and 8 frames per second. That is a huge thing in press work (just picture all the news clips featuring press photographers working, you will understand). I can now remove this item from my wishlist.
  • The record/video button on the top face can now be assigned a function. Ok, I know there are lots that can be assigned already and, if I don’t have it on a button then I can put it in the Q menu. I change the white balance (WB) a lot, preferably shooting a custom white balance (yes, this is still a planned post) and the white balance option in the Q menu does not offer the option to shot a new WB; only the option to select existing. However setting the “Video Button”, now known as FN7, to WB displays a small menu and allows me to shoot a new custom WB. Not having to dig in the main menu for this is a another step forward (and to be honest, a little similar to the way my old Nikons worked).

My Fn buttons are now set as follows:

FN Button Settings

FN Button Settings: Film Simulation. Direct Focus Point Control and WB.

With small steps we can travel a great distance and this new firmware is another small step. Not updated your camera yet? Head over to the X-T1 firmware page to download the latest.

I’ll sign off with an image from last night’s job..

Cally Jane Beech arrives on the pink carpet for the European Premiere of “How To Be Single”. Shot with a custom white balance 😉

Focus Pokus

One of the most important aspects of a modern camera to understand is the autofocus system. On the Fuji X-T1 this was recently totally changed and updated by new firmware. It was this change that led me to taking the plunge and switching to an all Fuji line-up. So, how do I set it up and how do I use the X-T1 autofocus system?

First I want to say this is not a be-all or end-all guide to using the AF system, I’m not going to go into every setting and describe it, I’m going to run through how I have it set up at the moment (it may well change), what I have found to date and that will sort of indicate why I have this set-up.

Firmware 4.0: New Modes.

Firmware 4 added the following improvements to the X-T1:

  • Zone and Wide Tracking Modes.
  • Improvement of Single Point AF accuracy.
  • Eye detection when Face detection is enabled.
  • Auto-Macro (no longer needing the Macro button to be pressed to focus on close objects).

Focusing in the studio.

To be honest, I do studio type shoots maybe once or twice a month, mainly corporate type portraits or headshots. Recently I shot a series of “amusing” portraits for a book and it was the first time in the studio with the new firmware.

For these I set the system into “single shot” mode and switched to the “zone focusing” with “Face Detection enabled” (as the settings shots below show – excuse the quick iPhone images).

Single Shot Focus Mode

Single Shot Focus Mode

Zone and Face Detect (Top Left)

Zone and Face Detect (Top Left)

The camera finds the face and eyes fine and after a few shots I was confident that the system would do as it was set up to, and find the face!

Yay! Face Found

Unless of course you cover it….

Doh!

Out and About.

When out and about my settings are basically to set the camera to Continuous AF (AF-C) Mode and Single Point. The main menu settings are below.

Continous Mode

Continous Mode

2015-08-05 20.42.59

AF Settings 1 (AF Mode is wrong here, should be point)

AF Settings

AF Settings 2

For this to work properly, elsewhere you need High-Performance switched on and (so I have recently read but not yet confirmed) the shutter on Mechanical (i.e. MS not ES or MS+ES).

I use the single point over the zone or area modes because I have found it to be faster. In the zone modes I have found there to be a slight delay when pressing the shutter which does not seem to be there in single point.

The key here is the Instant AF setting. By having this to AF-S (Single), it means if I use the back button, I can pick a point, focus on that point and recompose. If i place the single point on a subject and half-depress the shutter, the continuous starts tracking it!  Thats 2 modes, without changing settings!!

X-T1. 55-200. AF-C. 1/1700 @ F5.6 (AP)

So in practice, this fast moving kite-border was tracked by selecting a single point in the lower right of the central area (the bigger squares in the viewfinder are faster phase-detection points) then half-pressing the shutter and tracking, keeping the single point over him until I had the shot I wanted. Luckily I do not photograph fast moving sports (Motor Racing for example), if I did I’m not sure the tracking would keep up – I’ll test this soon.

Note: I should add this is exactly how I tracked moving subjects on my old system as well, I did not trust it’s full tracking modes either.

X-T1, 14mm 1/180 @ F14 (To balance Flash)

These girls with balloons were photographed at Brighton Pride where I was walking about, using AF-C to focus on people walking and moving, When I had people pose, I was able to use the back button to focus the single point on the faces, re-compose and shoot. (This was shot with an off-camera flash in my left hand as I held the camera in my right, a subject of a future post).

This is how I have it set up at the moment – it will might well change in the future as I learn more and if it does I will let you know. How do you have yours set up? Have you found anything different? Let me know.!

 

Julie x